Saturday, 1 July 2017

prototype planes for sale


When Joe Steiner and I started making planes we had a few simple goals - we wanted to make our own planes for our own use, and we had to have fun doing it. That was well before it turned into a business.

Once it turned into a business, those two goals remained, and we decided to keep the prototypes of each model for ourselves - that way, we would still end up ‘making our own planes’. We each have our own unique serial number, mine is KPXX-XX. The KP is for Konrad’s Plane, the next 2 digits are for the plane number, and the last 2 digits are for the year it was made. So, the first plane I made is stamped KP01-01 for the first plane, made in 2001.

The last serial number I stamped on one of my own planes was KP46-16. Yeah, that’s right... 46 planes. I was talking with a friend about it earlier this week, and he very politely asked how many of the 46 planes I actually use. I laughed and told him that quite a few of them sit idle in drawers. His response was perfect... he just said, ‘oh’ and let the question linger.

It has been lingering ever since, and I have come to the conclusion that these planes deserve to be used and not sit in the bottom of my bench drawers.

Six years ago, before I started the K-series of planes, I would have never considered selling any of the prototypes. They were my working planes and I was quite attached to them. As time has gone on, and as the K-series has grown, my attachment to these earlier planes has decreased. Largely because I essentially have 2 full sets of planes - the more traditional set, and the K-series. The K-series has become much more personal to me - it is a better representation of my own design aesthetic, and they represent what I feel are improvements to the traditional planes from an ergonomic standpoint.

These prototype planes are the ones I learned to make planes on. Several of them have minor variations. They also represent an interesting ‘type study’ - with changes that have evolved over time. I am not going to make any changes to any of them unless the buyer is interested in it. That work will be done free of charge. For example, the front bun on the Ebony filled A1 panel plane has quite sharp corners. This was a really early plane, and very shortly after, I modified the design to look and feel like the ones on the African Blackwood A2 jointing plane. If the new owner would like the corners rounded over - I am happy to do it. If you are interested in a particular plane, let me know and I can let you know which, if any, aspects have changed and we can take it from there.




No.4 smoother
- serial No. KP20-05
- bronze sides, lever cap and lever cap screw
- 7-1/2" long, 01 tool steel sole
- 2" wide, high carbon steel blade (from Ron Hock)
- 52.5 degree bed angle
- East Indian Rosewood infill (I will verify)
- SOLD








(Another) No.4 smoother
- serial No. KP18-05 
- bronze sides, lever cap and lever cap screw
- 7-1/2" long, 01 tool steel sole
- 2-1/4" wide, high carbon steel blade
- 50 degree bed angle
- African Blackwood infill
- SOLD

This plane is very wide and should only be purchased by someone with large hands. It has been nicknamed the ’zamboni’ by a friend of mine in Oregon.








(the soles of the two No.4’s for comparison)



No.A6 smoother
- serial No. KP12-03 
- bronze sides, lever cap and lever cap screw
- 01 tool steel sole
- 2-1/4" wide, high carbon steel blade
- 47.5 degree bed angle
- East Indian Rosewood infill
- $3,850 Cdn + actual shipping costs and insurance if desired

This plane has an Iles adjuster - a very early plane that was made before Joe and I started making our own adjusters. This plane does not have the tops of the sidewalls rounded over either, and I would suggest at a minimum, rounding over the edges of the infill of the front bun and transition the rounding into the lower area of the sidewall. It will change the patina of the bronze, but it will darken soon enough. Or it could be left alone - I used it like this for years.










No.A5 smoother
- serial No. KP19-05 
- bronze sides, lever cap and lever cap screw
- 01 tool steel sole
- 2-1/4" wide, high carbon steel blade
- 47.5 degree bed angle
- Honduran Rosewood infill
- $4,050 Cdn + actual shipping costs and insurance if desired

There isn’t much to apologize for with this plane, and is one of two that will be the toughest to let go. It was a workhorse. This has one of our adjusters in it, although the threads are not as new as they once were - a decade of people using the adjuster without loosening the lever cap screw has caused a bit of wear. I would also round over the inside corners of the front bun where the sidewall transitions.





 





No.A1 panel plane (14-3/4" long)
- serial No. KP15-03 
- bronze sides, lever cap and lever cap screw
- 01 tool steel sole
- 2-1/2" wide, high carbon steel blade (7/32" thick)
- 47.5 degree bed angle
- Ebony infill
- $4,750 Cdn + actual shipping costs and insurance if desired

This plane also has an Iles adjuster - another very early plane. As mentioned above, this plane has very sharp corners on the top of the front bun. I have debated on rounding these over for many, many years, but always thought I should leave them as they represent part of the evolution. But for someone else, I would really consider rounding them over to be more like the Blackwood A2 jointer - it will be a lot more comfortable.













No.1R rebate panel plane (15-1/2" long)
- serial No. KP35-11
- 01 tool steel sides and sole
- bronze lever cap and lever cap screw
- 2-1/2" wide, high carbon steel blade
- 47.5 degree bed angle
- Brazilian Rosewood infill
- $4,650 Cdn + actual shipping costs and insurance if desired

A rebate panel plane, inspired by an uncommon plane made by Stewart Spiers - shown on page 76 in Nigel Lampert’s 1998 book on Spiers. There were a few modifications - thicker sidewalks, increased surface area of the sidewall that connects the front and back of the plane, and I pinned the lever cap instead of making it removable. This was the prototype plane and has been unused since 2011.
Ideally, this one will be easier to keep in Canada given that Brazilian is listed on CITIES appendix 1, but I can get an export permit for it as I have documentation for the wood.













No.A2 jointing plane (22-1/2" long)
- serial No. KP23-05 
- bronze sides, lever cap and lever cap screw
- 01 tool steel sole
- 2-5/8" wide, high carbon steel blade
- 47.5 degree bed angle
- African Blackwood infill
- SOLD

This will be the single hardest plane to let go. It has sat on the right side of my bench for over 12 years, always within arms reach. It has been to countless shows and planed countless feet of wood. It has one of our own adjusters in it and works wonderfully.












No.7 Norris type shoulder plane
- serial No. KP24-05 
- bronze sides and keeper
- 8" long, 01 tool steel sole
- 1-1/4" wide, high carbon steel blade
- 20 degree bed angle
- Brazilian Rosewood infill
- SOLD

The Norris shoulder plane is the closest I have ever come to copying an original design. I had always loved this design, and Joel at Tools for Working wood was kind enough to scan his original Norris that I used to create the drawings. Another work horse for me with some really striking Brazilian Rosewood infill. Ideally, this one will be easier to keep in Canada given that Brazilian is listed on CITIES appendix 1, but I can get an export permit for it as I have documentation for the wood.











No.3 rebate plane
- serial No. KP21-05 
- bronze sides and keeper
- 9" long, 01 tool steel sole
- 1/2" wide, high carbon steel blade
- 28.5 degree bed angle
- Kingwood infill
- SOLD

I had made a set of rebate planes very early one (they will be the next items in this list) and I wanted to make one with bronze sides - this was that plane. A great rebate plane that I used more than I ever thought I would. 











No.3 rebate plane (1/2", 3/4", 1" and 1-1/4" wide)
- serial No. KP06-02 thru KP09-02 
- 9" long, mild steel sides and sole
- high carbon steel blades from Ray Iles
- 28.5 degree bed angle
- Cocobolo infill
- $1,700 Cdn each + actual shipping costs and insurance if desired

These were the first joinery planes I made and are really, really early. They have blades from Ray Iles and are made with mild steel as opposed to 01 tool steel. They show the fact that they are early planes, but are totally functional and were used often. Most of them have a gap where the sole meets the sidewall under the blade. I will point it out in the photo below. This isn’t a functional issue, but is not as tidy and is evidence of ‘learning to make planes’. They are discounted accordingly.







(the small gap where the sole meets the side shown above and below)


(Another ‘eccentricity’ I hadn’t noticed before... I filed a single rounded
chamfer termination in one corner of the 1/2" rebate plane)

If you are interested, please send me an email, konrad@sauerandsteiner.com.

Also, for any American customers, keep in mind that the exchange rate is in your favour at the moment - take roughly 25% off these prices for USD. I can figure out the exact exchange rate at the time of purchase.


4 Comments:

Blogger Jameel Abraham said...

Oh my. These will be collector's items someday. Like, tomorrow. I may have to cash in some of my own tools to have a piece of history. Wow.

1 July 2017 at 16:50  
Blogger Bob Duff said...

It's a real treat to see these planes again.

However, I agree with you on the K planes. The design of them is very special. Love the lines, curves and how the light reflects off the facets.
It's your unique signature style. (Sleek, powerful, nimble......Porsche like 😜)

Bob

2 July 2017 at 10:39  
Blogger Konrad said...

Thanks J,
Would love for one of these to be on your bench.
cheers,
k

2 July 2017 at 10:41  
Blogger Konrad said...

Thanks Bob,
It really is almost surprising to me that I am ok with parting with these... 6 years ago I would have never imagined thinking this way, but the K-series really has struck a chord with me. Porsche like... best compliment of the week... thanks.

best wishes,
konrad

2 July 2017 at 10:43  

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