Sunday, 16 April 2017

Blasted p1800s!



For the last few weeks, the grade 12 class has been diligently working at scraping off all the rubberized undercoating on the car. It was a thankless job, tiring, slow, and frankly, pretty annoying. I was pretty impressed with how they stuck with it and pushed through the pain and suffering.

When the soda blasting guy showed up to see the car for the first time, he commented that we had done a great job getting the ‘stuff’ off. The challenge is that most media will not be able to remove it effectively, and where it blasts off, it will often stick to another close by area... so you can effectively chase it around the car for hours.



The underside of the car pre-blasting...


 ... and after a test to see how things were going to work. It was amazing how fast it was with the right set-up.


There was some concern about the mess and noise, and while it was both messy and noisy - it was not too bad.



We opted not to do the entire car, but the engine bay, the interior, the entire underside and all the seams and any other areas that had rust or repair work that had to be removed, or re-done. If there was good paint adhesion on any of the larger panels, we could scuff sand them ourselves or take them down to bare metal at a later date. 


A detail shot of the seams (click for a larger image).


The underside was the most impressive. There were only a couple of surprises - areas that were a little more rusted that we expected, but for the most part, nothing too major.


In other news, I have started working on planes again - about 15 minutes a day. I was feeling ready to get back at it and figured a very short period of time might be the way to do it. I would work for 15 minutes and regardless of how things felt at the end of that time, I would stop and wait 24 hrs to make sure things were ok. Obviously, if there was any pain, I would stop. I worked most of last week and I have to say it was incredibly rewarding... I had forgotten how much I missed what I had grown so used to doing. It felt great to file again, bend sidewalls and even piening went ok... although I know that is going to be a very challenging task. It may take me several days to pien a shell together, or even longer, but I am going to continue to forge ahead.Thanks to everyone who has called, sent emails, commented on instagram... all the encouragement has been very much appreciated.

I have been posting short videos of this post injury plane build on instagram - here is a link if you want to follow along.






1 Comments:

Blogger Kevin Brehon said...

Hi Konrad,
I am loving all the short videos on the plane making process. Glad you are finding a way without rushing. Oh, and that car stuff is pretty cool too;)

18 April 2017 at 00:47  

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Wednesday, 8 March 2017

Magnificent neighbourhood Silver Maple



 In 2012, a massive Silver Maple tree needed to come down in our neighbourhood. The sawyer who milled it for me described it as a ‘once in a lifetime log’. It is full of curl, quilt and some birds eye thrown in for good measure. I had it sawn through and through into 9 slabs. They were stacked and stickered for 5 years under cover in an open sided drying barn and were moved into a drying kiln a few years ago. I am going to keep a couple of these, but have come to realize I have a serious wood sickness, and cannot possibly use all of these in my lifetime... so I am looking to sell a few of them. We are also in the midst of a car restoration project and a few of these would help fund it. 

These are located in Southern Ontario - near K-W, and given their size, pick-up only please. 

(slab 1)

Slab 1
Thickness - 9/4
narrowest point - 28”
Widest point - ?
height - 7’ (note that 7’ is below the large insect created opening)
$550.00 Cdn












 (slab 2)

Slab 2 (on the left, slab 1 on the right)
Thickness - 9/4
narrowest point - 26”
Widest point - ?
height - 7’ (note that 7’ is below the large insect created opening)
$500.00 Cdn




 

 (slab 3)

Slab 3
Thickness - 11/4
narrowest point - 33”
Widest point - 47"
height - 11’ (132”)
$950.00 Cdn








 (slab 4)

Slab 4
Thickness - 12/4
narrowest point - 31”
Widest point - 45"
height - 136"
$1,100.00 Cdn










 (slab 5)

Slab 5
Thickness - 12/4
narrowest point - 35”
Widest point - 46"
height - 136"
$1,250.00 Cdn 




 
(slab 6)

Slab 6
Thickness - 12/4
narrowest point - 28”
Widest point - 43"
height - 133"
$1,000.00 Cdn








(slab 7)

Slab 7 (this one has the pith present and is quarter sawn)
Thickness - 11/4
narrowest point - 37”
Widest point - 47"
height - 139”
$1,100.00 Cdn





 (slab 8)

Slab 8
Thickness - 11/4
narrowest point - 37”
Widest point - 47”
height - 138”
$1,150.00 Cdn













(slab 9)



Slab 9
Thickness - 11/4
narrowest point - 37”
Widest point - 46"
height - 135”
$1,150.00 Cdn







I am not committed to keeping any particular slabs, so all are essentially available. Send me an email if you are interested, konrad@sauerandsteiner.com

5 Comments:

Blogger David said...

Wow, that is a lot of nice slabs and well priced!! I wish I was closer to p/u one or two!!
Tom Fidgen should be all over that!!
Cheers
David

8 March 2017 at 12:17  
Blogger Konrad said...

Hi David,

Yeah, they are pretty nice - and glad to know you think the pricing is about right... always tough to know what people expect.

cheers,
konrad

8 March 2017 at 17:21  
Blogger David said...

I'd buy that 11/4 in a heart beat. I mean price is wha it is and from up here it sure seams decent!! But people in Ontario might think differently!! I wonder how much it would cost to get one of those slabs shipped up!?!?! Any smaller quarter sawn boards?

Cheers!

David

8 March 2017 at 17:54  
Blogger Konrad said...

People surrounded by trees tend to undervalue them. I have no clue about shipping... I suspect it would be quite a bit of money. There are some smaller quarter sawn boards - how thick?

8 March 2017 at 20:59  
Blogger David said...

Really... I mean 5/4 to 8/4 would be great!! Spalted even better... Doesn't have to be long, 4-5 feet long is usually enough for most furniture projects... 8 inches and wider....
Just for fun!
Thank you so much for getting back on that!! I mean I could never afford one of your plane, but maybe I can get some of your wood lol!!
Cheers
David

8 March 2017 at 21:03  

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